Tag Archives: avascular necrosis

Proof of Concept: Experimental Metatarsal osteotomy Leads to Greater Reduction in Plantar Pressure Versus Weil Osteotomy and its Modifications

For treating various conditions that result in metatarsalgia, the basic aim is to reduce load transmission through the operated metatarsal and reduce pressure on the plantar surface of the metatarsal. The classic Weil osteotomy, recommended for the subluxed or dislocated metatarsal phalangeal joint (MTPJ), is effective for reducing pain.

According to Umur Aydogan, M.D., Penn State Hershey Bone and Joint Institute, “Although Weil osteotomy can be effective, some patients experience complications, like recurrent or transfer metatarsalgia, ‘floating toe,’ avascular necrosis, and stiffness. Some complications may occur because this is an intra-articular procedure.”

Aydogan, along with biomechanical engineering colleagues at Penn State Hershey, has explored an alternative extra-articular procedure to reduce the high plantar pressure associated with metatarsalgia. In a cadaveric model, they compared the effects on plantar pressure following classic and modified Weil osteotomies versus their extra-articular, proximal metatarsal diaphyseal oblique dorsiflexion second metatarsal osteotomy. The findings will be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS).1

Biomechanical set up and osteotomy illustration

Biomechanical set up and osteotomy illustration

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Successful Repair of Osteochondritis Dissecans: Sometimes Less Is More

For osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee, avascular necrosis of subchondral bone can lead to fragmentation of bone and overlying cartilage [Figure 1]; osteochondral loose body formation may occur, leading to pain and further articular damage. According to Kevin Black, M.D., Penn State Hershey Bone and Joint Institute, “The number one goal in treating all patients with OCD is to preserve the articular surface. In skeletally immature children, OCD tends to heal on its own with three to six months of rest and limited activity. In skeletally mature patients, the lesions don’t heal and predictably require surgery.” Continue reading

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